Sunday, January 30, 2011

Brrrr!



History
In 1885, a New York Times Reporter wrote that Saint Paul was the "Siberia of America" and questioned whether it was fit for human habitation. Offended by this attack on their Capital City, the Saint Paul Chamber of Commerce decided to not only prove that Saint Paul was habitable, but that its citizens were very much alive during winter, the most dominant season. Thus was born the Saint Paul Winter Carnival.


In 1886, King Boreas I was crowned at the first Winter Carnival. This festival also featured an ice castle -- an elaborate creation made from Minnesota lakes . The Saint paul Winter Carnival, also known as "The Coolest Celebration on Earth," is the nation's oldest and largest winter festival. With many events -- including the breathtaking ice sculptures and parades  -- the Carnival has become a trademark of history, community spirit and togetherness, turning Saint Paul into a winter wonderland in late January.


Added Later:
BINGO: Go to the following links to see more St. Paul Winter Carnival photos of two other bloggers!


Slinger's and Kim's.

13 comments:

  1. This is so lovely, Kate. Beautiful carving. I love the story. Don't think I could live in such a cold climate tho but am sure I'd enjoy the carnival. Enjoy! How's the shoulder?

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  2. Fun, I bet! Like this shot too.

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  3. I went to your links and saw some of the ice carvings. I didn't know it existed until I read you r post today.

    I have been to the Sapporo snow festival. It is amazing. You can rent a room in an ice hotel and sleep on an ice bed and get the treatment you would get in a regular hotel. Among other things being carved and cut up. It is amazing.

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  4. You summarized it well with this photo!

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  5. Wow this is awesome. Bet it's a fun time. I would love to that event one day.

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  6. Siberia!! The winter carnival sounds like just the thing.

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  7. I had heard of the winter carnival but, had no idea it was well over 100 years old. Love this ice sculpture announcing the event.

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  8. That's how you turn icy opinions into ice castles!

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  9. "and questioned whether it was fit for human habitation"

    This answers the question.....

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  10. I did find it difficult to photograph the ice sculptures. You had to be at the right angle to see the text, if you were too much to one side, the ice was see through and the text was gone.

    I hadn't been the the parade in many years. If it works out, I'm going to the torch light parade also.

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  11. I am sensing the start of a series about the winter carnival. I look forward to it.

    Re your question about the Connecticut River flooding, I don't think it is usually a big issue. The river is wide and slow moving, and the floodplain is pretty wide, so the banks can overflow without much damage in the floodplain. Of course, this year's snowfall throughout New England has been huge, so the spring melt could cause problems. Usually it is the smaller and faster running rivers around here that damage their surroundings when the flooding is atypically bad.

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  12. HA! I LOVE how the festival came to be! YES, winter IS cold but that doesn't mean we can't enjoy it. :)

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