Sunday, September 23, 2007

Time Marches On!

This is a collage of scenes that have been duplicated in countries around the globe this fall. Educational programs are important stepping stones for future citizens, and it often begins here. Oh, how I wish that the excitement and pleasure that is obvious at this level would follow students throughout their lives. From personal experience in a classroom with much older students, I know that that level of curiosity, imagination, and motivation too often falls by the wayside.. I wonder why? What's your opinion?

14 comments:

  1. That's such an interesting thing to think about, Kate.

    I wonder if part of it isn't that as a young child, you are somewhat unaware of the give-and-take of life, that every action has an equal and opposite reaction, that as you grow older, rewards and consequences often seem to change, to increase in different increments. The earth you stand on can alternately be supportive and challenging. Lots of children learn it's safer to not take changes, be they chances exercising their curiosity, imagination, motivation.

    By the way, "The War" is on Oregon Public Broadcasting right now. It's powerful. My friends in Seattle are watching it right now, too. Thanks again for telling me about the documentary.

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  2. il est pas toujours facile, dans certain pays de suivre une education, malheureusement ;o((


    it is not always easy, in certain country to follow an education, unfortunately ;O((

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  3. I can't say anything about other countries but in France, I think educational system is organized more for teachers than for students...So children's enthusiasm won't be long in fading...My two children are good students but would have many things to tell you on this subject. Have a nice week, dear Kate.

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  4. Of course the start in kindegarten can be tough, here in France kids mostly start at the latest at three, so there is alway a bit of crying the first day(s)!

    When it comes to the continued "curiosity" etc... my experience with my own kids (and myself) is that it goes up and down according to the years. Once you get to something that really captivates, it's "up"! Fortunately!

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  5. It's complicated, isn't it? There are probably as many reasons as people. Working with students entering university straight from high school, I notice how little they are engaged. But the students who return after a number of years understand the value of learning and are much more curious. I'd like to sit down and talk about it, but I know for me, at age 12, I wasn't interested in what was being taught, such as algebra, which I couldn't keep up with.

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  6. Kate: thank you for your kind words about the loss of our Wendydog, we miss her a lot.

    Regarding education... when we are little, Kindergarden seems such a huge adventure and we just soak up everything the teacher can provide. But the magic fades... and it turns into something we HAVE to do, and there are so many alternatives, until we decide we WANT to do it, and then the enthusiasm returns.

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  7. Congratulations on your little student, Olivia's first days of school.

    My guess is peer pressure and social cliques are what drive the lack of motoivation. Or, possibly, too many cshool and after school activities. I could be wrong though.

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  8. Learning the basics at school is one thing, but I have never seen any emphasis put on showing youngsters what kinds of occupations are there for them in their futures. I would love to see kids take more aptitude tests, good ones, that can help them realize what jobs are available that match their natural aptitudes.

    I had no idea about many jobs until I searched them out in my twenties. I went back to college in my early thirties to get my engineering degree. That was all after I got sick of my life being aimless and spent two years scouring our library and taking self test to help me find possible jobs that match my interests.

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  9. I tend to agree with ex-shammickite that it goes from magic to something that has to be done and some teachers don't challenge or be creative. Still the schools continue to turn out a group of wonderful young people each year that mold and shape our society.
    Great question Kate, and i know your granddaughter will be one of those special people. Look who she has for a Grandma!

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  10. I wonder that too often. We have talked about innocence, happiness, and learning in small kids before, remember? I am neither a great believer nor a pure atheist. I understand about brain development, social behaviour, and society prejudices and bad influences. I reckon that we are born sort of clean, openminded, curious and then we change. But most of all I believe there is something almost mystic then that we lose. Something mysterious, like a gift that we let go. What is it that we see in a child's face that makes us adore them, why do we give the best we can in front of child, we believe they are pure and in front of that we abandon our "sins" for a while. I know I am a little off topic here but I wanted to let you know why I think they lose excitement in upper levels besides the educational factor. Thanks Kate for wondering.

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  11. I don't know for sure, I'd say the innocence & energy of childhood is just so fabulous; but it fades slowly but inevetibly.

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  12. Hi Kate, what an exciting day! My pre-schooler has homework and I am starting to wonder how to get him to see it as fun.

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  13. congratulations to Olivia.
    lovely pictures Kate and a very interesting subject.

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  14. To some extent childhood has been sophisticated too much and maybe, kids emerge jaded at an early age. Some styles of schooling in their current form are quite unsuitable and schools need to be reinvented but then, I'm an idealist! But then, if schools were TOO successful then the young may not choose to go to war, might see it for what it is

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