Tuesday, October 02, 2007

September 11, 2001


Birth: May 29, 1963
Minneapolis
Hennepin County
Minnesota, USA
Death: Sep. 11, 2001
Shanksville
Somerset County
Pennsylvania, USA

United Flight 93 Passenger, Hero. A former high school quarterback, he was an alumnus of the University of Minnesota. He was the senior vice president and chief operating officer of Thoratec Corporation, a medical research company. He and his wife Deena, married in April, 1992, were the parents of three girls. On September 11, 2001, he was flying home from a business meeting when terrorists took control of the plane, presumably with the intent of crashing it into a target in Washington, D.C. Burnett used his cell phone to call his wife four times. During their conversations he told her of the happenings on board the plane and she told him of the attacks on the World Trade Center. His last call to his wife ended with Burnett saying, “We’re going to do something. I’ve got to go.” (Fort Snelling National Cemetery site)

28 comments:

  1. Oh, Kate, this made me well up with tears. Thank you for sharing this photo. I never want to forget those who lost their lives that day.

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  2. The hero´s allways live.

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  3. Oh, my goodness. I had no idea he was buried at the cemetery I saw twice already on this thought-provoking theme day.

    Thank you for sharing your poignant photo of one of America's citizen soldiers who gave his live for others on Sept. 11.

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  4. A touching post.. how brave those passengers were.

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  5. Thank you Tom. peace

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  6. oh my thats very touching. great post kate.

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  7. Sad theme, sad days and great post!

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  8. I can't think of anything to say except very emotional. Nice shot.

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  9. nice memory..they were really heros!

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  10. bel hommage, triste et dur moment ;o(((


    beautiful homage, sad and hard moment ;O(((

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  11. Kate, thanks for bringing a hero back to life.

    --steve buser
    New Orleans Daily Photo

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  12. To read the details of one person dying on that awful day brings it home even more. As if we'll ever forget. We won't.

    Thanks, Kate.

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  13. Well that is indeed a striking photo and after reading your narrative it turned into a compassionate story for me. So little time, so little experience and such a monumental sacrifice. Impressive post.

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  14. Mort où est ta victoire ?
    Death where is your victory ?
    So sad for his family and friends.
    So much to do and love.

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  15. It's stories like those that provide hope in the midst of sadness. Hope and awareness that we can all choose to fight evil even in the face of death.

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  16. Wonderful photo and touching story.

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  17. Thank you Kate for bringing this to our attention again. I am greatful for the sacrifice that was given so we coul live.
    Beautiful an touching.

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  18. Nice picture assorted with emotion in your comment.
    Nobody can forget this day - every one remember what he was doing when the heard the informations about this tragedy.
    Unforgetable day...

    Thank you for your nice comment and for your visit on my two photo-blogs:
    http://chateau-gontier-daily-photo.blogspot.com/

    http://laurent-christophe.blogspot.com/

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  19. Very sad...but what a hero. Really brings the reality of 9/11 home. Thanks for your comment yesterday over at Toruń DP...I have replied!

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  20. wow, what a terrible story. I was very shocked with september 11, and thinking about what really happened in that flight makes my hair to stand on end... I hope we never forget but I also hope we don't run into the same brick wall a thousand times again trying to make peace making war...

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  21. Thanks for the kind words on my page Kate. Yes, I see what you mean - indeed an appropriate post in a different way. Quite moving indeed.

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  22. Thank you for sharing all of that, Kate. Let's hope we never forget all of the heroes of that day.

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  23. Hi Kate....thanks for visiting. I hope I didn't convey the wrong meaning....I just thought it was notable the number of military cemeteries....because there have been so many conflicts that the US has so many military cemeteries - it's quite rare here! I found a war graves cemetery here in Syudney and posted about it a while ago and it caused an interesting reaction cos Australian don't even know we have them! Overseas, yes, in Gallipoli particularly they are now a site of pilgrimage, and I have been to many in France on the western front. Extremely moving they are too.

    But they are old conflicts, and bodies weren't repatriated in those days.

    I don't even know where the 500 Australian bodies from the Vietnam War would be!
    I just think thois kind of cemetery is deep in the American psyche becausee there has been so much loss, from the Revolutionary War on! I don't think that is support for any particular waar! Hope that clears that up!

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  24. PS This story and picture is chilling.

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  25. Thanks to all of you who have already visited today; it was a momentous event, and I hope that it never occurs again--in any country in the world.

    Sally, it never occurred to me that your comment about our military cemeteries was a criticism. Your commentary made me think a lot about the past.

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  26. Your words gave me chills...I wish more young people would realize that there are heros they can look up to...instead of Britney and Paris.

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  27. Just as I mourn my relatives of the Dakota 38 hanged in Mankato, I show you respect for your loved ones in that they may find comfort with the Great Spirit.

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