Friday, September 14, 2012

Friday Fences



Do Not Fence Me In...
Do Fences Make Good Neighbors?
Frost  Did Not Think So!


To see more Friday Fences, go here.

ADDED LATER: Because Kathy asked her question, I did some research:

Description - Western red cedar stack fence, developed by early American pioneers, has also commonly been referred to as Battlefield fence, Worm fence, Snake fence, and ZigZag fence.Cedar stack fence offers both natural beauty and rustic charm. Installation is easy and because no fence post hole drilling are typically required, this stack style of fence is especially popular in difficult soils and rocky terrain. Further, when installed properly, the entire fence is above the ground level which eliminates ground contact and is practically entirely rot free.
Western red cedar stack fences and cedar split rail fences have proven more weather-resistant than those made of Pine, Spruce, and Hemlock. Cedar also resists insect infestation. Western red cedar wood has a distinct color which left uncoated will weather to a silver gray color. Cedar stack rail fence is very rustic in appearance. Each rail and post come in a slightly different size and shape. For the customers who prefer a uniform and consistent low-maintenance fence, we strongly suggest considering a product in vinyl. Click here for information.
Advantages - Cedar stack rail fence is a cost effective style for defining boundaries, and decorating property. Stack rail fencing is also one of, if not the easiest style of fence to install making it an ideal project for the do-it-yourselfer. There is no need to dig any post holes or purchase any fence posts for most fence installations. (Note: Unscarfed rails are predrilled at no extra cost. Our mill orients rails so they will sit squarely on one another and drills a 5/8” hole approximately 1’ from end of rail. Rebar stakes/ spikes can then be used to secure rails in place and into the ground.)
Disadvantages - Stack fence requires more materials (fence rails) to create the zig-zag fence pattern than conventional split rail of comparable height and footage. Fence requires a preservative for the longest-lasting performance, however most installations are never treated. (Credit: http://www.hooverfence.com/wood/stack-battlefield-cedar-fence.htm)

18 comments:

  1. Beautiful fence! I had one of these, covered in autumn clematis, in the corner of the garden once upon a time...

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  2. great shot. i've always enjoyed this type of fence. simple & decorative. (:

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  3. i love this style of fencing :)

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  4. I love these zig zag fences...they really do make for a great photo shot!

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  5. I think fences serve a purpose...and this one is even beautiful.

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  6. I've often wondered do these type of fences just stand up by themselves or are the slats (or whatever you want to call them) somehow attached to one another. I've also been curious as to what one calls this type of fence. I just think of them as zig-zags!

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  7. I like these old fashioned fences.

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  8. This is one of my favorite types of fences, though I am glad I don't have to mow around one.

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  9. Thanks, Kate. Now I understand what keeps them from falling down!

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  10. Looks like it has been there a while!!!

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  11. It looks heavy and quite resistant!

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  12. The perfect kind of fence...I have always thought so! I love the photo of it, and I am so glad you added all the info.

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  13. I've never been much of a fan of this kind of fence. It always looks like it's falling apart or falling down. But there is a certain rural attractiveness to it. Thanks for the commentary; that was most interesting and informative.

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  14. Nice looking fence.

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  15. I first saw this kind of fence in Wyoming and thought it was a western fence, but last year I was in a historical village in Massachusetts and saw it there, too. It wouldn't look right in a well-tended suburban lot, but on the right kind of farm or spacious place, it is wonderful. (Thanks for the follow-up note . . . were you a research librarian as well as a teacher?)

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    1. No, Jack, it's undying curiosity and a need to know!

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  16. I think in the right spot these fences are fabulous Kate, they have so much character and how satisfying to do it yourself..

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  17. Beautiful picture! I do think my goats would just climb over a fence like that though.

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