Friday, March 22, 2013

Sweetgrass Baskets


The Sweetgrass Baskets
Purchased for Family Heirlooms
Gullah Culture Gifts



History: Sweetgrass basket making has been a part of the Mount Pleasant, SC community for more than 300 years. Brought to the area by slaves who came from West Africa, basket making is a traditional art form which has been passed on from generation to generation. Basketmaking has always involved the entire family. As a custom, men gathered the materials while women weave the baskets.

Material: Baskets are made with Sweetgrass, Bulrush or Marsh, Long Leaf Pine Needle, and Palmetto Leaves. Baskets can be cleaned with mild soap using a cloth or soft brush. A simple design can take 6-12 hours and a more creative, complex design can take as long as 5 days.

19 comments:

  1. How serendipitous, I've been researching their sweetgrass baskets. Lovely!

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  2. BEST. GIFTS. EVER! My dad bought us a neat bowl many, many years ago... it looks exactly as it did then, and we use it daily!
    Gorgeous!

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  3. They are beautiful and there's nothing like handmade goods! How many did you buy?

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  4. How wonderful that this craft has not been lost over time, in fact is still flourishing. Beautiful to my eyes!

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  5. stare into the basket and find a ship. Five days, not much is handmade now days. They are all works of art.

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  6. Handmade traditional crafts are indeed treasures to perpetuate. The Gullah culture is probably little known outside the Southeast.

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  7. Wish I had a spot to put one of the those!

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  8. So beautiful and such craftsmanship.

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  9. wow! really cool! just beautiful!

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  10. I hope these traditions carry on to future generations. They are truly works of art.

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  11. I love going shopping with you, Kate. You always find such interesting items and my wallet is a safe distance from the action.

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  12. I know a spot that has loads of Bulrush plants at Coombe. Next time I see them I will think of this post on your blog. Wonderful and super photos too.

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  13. These are lovely, Kate. When we were in Charleston, we planned to buy a couple of these, but we didn't act right away and then we didn't see other appropriate baskets before we left. Next time!

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  14. Wonderful assets. I hope you bought a couple.

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  15. Magnificent pieces of craftsmanship, great capture!

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  16. Beautiful craftsmanship.

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  17. These are wonderful, Kate.

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  18. So amazing to think of someone sitting weaving in this very same method hundred of years ago Kate, some things will never change.

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  19. I don't know what sweetgrass is, but I love handwoven baskets of all kinds! I'm glad we have plenty of them here.

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